E-ISSN 2548-0839
European Endodontic Journal Diabetes Mellitus Affects the Microhardness of Root Dentine: An in-vitro Study [Eur Endod J]
Eur Endod J. 2022; 7(2): 122-128 | DOI: 10.14744/eej.2022.37029

Diabetes Mellitus Affects the Microhardness of Root Dentine: An in-vitro Study

Mohammad Ali Saghiri1, Behnam Rahmani2, Michael Conte3, Devyani Nath4, Ove Peters5, Steven Morgano6
1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Rutgers Faculty of Dental Medicine, New Jersey, USA / Department of Endodontics, University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni Faculty of Dentistry, California, USA
2Sector of Angiogenesis Regenerative Medicine, Dr. Hajar Afsar Lajevardi Research Group (ADMD), New Jersey, USA
3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Affairs, Rutgers Faculty of Dental Medicine, New Jersey, USA
4Department of Restorative Dentistry, Biomaterials and Prosthodontics Laboratory, Rutgers Faculty of Dental Medicine, New Jersey, USA
5Department of Endodontics, University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni Faculty of Dentistry, California, USA; Oral Health Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
6Department of Restorative Dentistry, Rutgers Faculty of Dental Medicine, New Jersey, USA

Objective: This study was undertaken to compare microhardness and erosion susceptibility of root dentine in teeth extracted from diabetic and non-diabetic donors after the application of different root canal irrigants.
Methods: Forty-eight single-rooted premolars with single canals (24 each from diabetic and non-diabetic) were selected, and root canals were shaped by using rotary ProTaper files. Dentine slices of 4 mm were transversely sectioned from the middle root third. Specimens were assigned to four subgroups (n=6) and irrigated for 5 minutes: 1) 2.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); 2) 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 3) 2% chlorhexidine (CHX); and 4) normal saline. Surface microhardness was determined at 100- and 500-µm depths from the pulp–dentine interface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the severity of dentine erosion. Data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA, Post-hoc Tukey’s, and Chi-square tests (P<0.05).
Results: Diabetes as well as NaOCl and EDTA decreased surface microhardness of dentine significantly (P<0.05). Diabetes had little effect on the erosion susceptibility of dentine (P>0.05).
Conclusion: Root canal irrigants can significantly lower the microhardness; specifically, in diabetic patients, and may be a factor affecting the longevity of root canal-treated teeth. (EEJ-2021-08-146)

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, erosion, microhardness, root canal irrigant

Mohammad Ali Saghiri, Behnam Rahmani, Michael Conte, Devyani Nath, Ove Peters, Steven Morgano. Diabetes Mellitus Affects the Microhardness of Root Dentine: An in-vitro Study. Eur Endod J. 2022; 7(2): 122-128

Corresponding Author: Mohammad Ali Saghiri
Manuscript Language: English
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